The agricultural opportunities and challenges in Kenya are enormous.

And so is the need, but we have to create a massive paradigm shift with a very small core of people.

It could be intimidating to a point of paralysis, but I’m helped by an attitude that is bolstered by stories like this.

The Mississippi Effect.

Systems sometimes stand balanced precariously on the cusp of change. We may return to the river analogy by noting some interesting facts about the Mississippi. Basically, the river meanders through its last several hundred miles before spilling into the Gulf of Mexico in a general course that could not be altered by any event of less than cataclysmic proportions. But its local course is subject to drastic alteration by remarkably trivial events. A person with a shovel can, at the right place, start a small cut that gets bigger and bigger until the whole river flows through the new channel and an entire curve of the river is obliterated. (This fact was an ever-present consideration to nineteenth-century owners of river-front property, who often hired men to shoot on sight any suspicious persons caught upriver in the possession of digging implements.)  Ross, Lee. The Person and the Situation

In Kenya, the “river” is an agricultural and cultural paradigm, but in addition to shovels we have one other “Power tool.”

It will soon become apparent that it’s genuinely in everyone’s best self interest to make the shift, and it will literally lead to “greener” pastures.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: