Getting lights, food security and discretionary income to 600 million people is achievable. No “charity,” just productive work and fair earnings for the adults in the families

The potential profitability is in the areas of Sub Saharan Africa where no one is looking.  And, it’s sustainable productivity that supports business structures where  “every party wins”.  From the poorest subsistence farmers, up through the entire supply, services, and support tiers of a high value-added  processing plant

The only thing new about the approach is the broad-based business model. The revenue model is already working in South Africa where the raw ingredients are grown, and concentrated, frozen or powdered into long shelf life exportable products. The difference between South Africa and the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa has been South Africa’s availability of cheap and reliable electricity.

There are many large underutilized areas of Sub-Saharan Africa that have complete ecosystems capable of growing the needed raw food products. They just lack the reliable energy needed by the value-added segment of the process.

Now, with affordable and reliable clean and renewable electricity that can be near the point of food production, we can bring the capability to do the value-added food processing to the food farming areas.

This will bring a whole new economy to the area by enabling the gross revenue enhancement of food processing.  Sustainability is in the fabric of this business model.  A new food processing plant using 50 employees, will create a minimum of 1000 peripheral jobs.

Another essential is creating privately owned and managed farmers cooperatives. Business-oriented management at the outset will also provide the capability of maintaining the transparent equitable distribution models. The cooperatives can maintain the new buying power and affordable electrification at the farmer level.  

The distributed energy and food processing approach can now make it possible for smallholder farmers to produce and monetize crops that would be lost to spoilage without the markets, and refrigeration capability in the immediate areas of production.  Tomatoes, avocados, citrus, extractives for essential oils, can now be grown and processed for far-off markets.

Part of our commitment is to develop this enterprise in a way that also allows others to replicate the successes and avoid repeating the inevitable –Surprises- that accompany first implemented new enterprises.  

For more information call or text Bill Williams at 01 303 888 0380, William@Altresco, or connect on Facebook or LinkedIn with William Ross Williams.

©William Ross Williams 2.16.2019.

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